Victor Mathieu [Interview]

 

Welcome to Day 11 of Trainwreck’d Society’s Annual Month of Horror Showcase! We have a fully loaded month of all things horror for you fine folks! October is our favorite month for this very reason, and we are so excited to share 31 full days of film showcases and interviews with some of the finest folks from the world of horror, just as we have been doing for the last 6 years. What started as a simple 5 day showcase, has now blossomed into a full blown month long event. You’re going to love this! Enjoy!

 

Hello Folks! We have an incredible interview for you fine folks which we have wanted to have on the site for quite a long time. In fact, I believe our guest was meant to be on last year, but schedules permitting, he was unable to make it. But, we are so excited that he is with us here today to grace our digital pages. It’s Victor Mathieu! Victor has worked in a plethora of fields in the world of film and television, and in several different genres. But his work in the world of horror has been especially compelling. And that is essentially what we are here for this month, amiright? In recent years, he has developed two extremely compelling horror flicks that I truly cannot say enough great things about. Those would be The Monster Project and Dead List. The latter being distributed by our friends at High Octane Pictures, who regular readers will recognize as a company we have featured so much work from over the years.

Victor kicked off his career as production assistant on such amazing projects like An Inconvenient Truth and Mamma Mia, and has worked his way into our hearts as one of today’s finest talents. And we are so excited to have him finally be a part of our Month of Horror series. So Folks, please enjoy some wonderful words fro the great Victor Mathieu!

 

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What inspired you to get into the world of entertainment and filmmaking? Was it an early aspiration you can always remember having since your youth, or did you just find yourself in this world one day?

I discovered a love for the arts through music at an early age. When I was young, I was in a band and fell in love with being on stage, so I pursued acting. Through that, I discovered a passion for directing. I went on and directed a few films and other content, until just about two years ago during which I closed that door to produce full time.

What was your first paid gig in the world of entertainment? And were there any kind of lessons learned from this project that still affect your work today?

My first gig in LA was working for Lawrence Bender at A Band Apart. I was a part time production assistant on an Oscar winning documentary he produced at the time called An Inconvenient Truth, and through that, I discovered the rush to succeed in the world of cinema at that time and have been addicted to it ever since.

I am very intrigued by a TV mini-series, according to IMDb, that you did in 2017 entitled The Smiling Man. Can you tell us a bit about this project? What made you want to tell this tale?

The Smiling Man is a creature that evolved tremendously during the post-production phase of The Monster Project. The creature was never meant to be shown in any shape or form in the film, hence why you really only see him in the form of static throughout The Monster Project. We all kind of fell in love with the terrifying look of this demonic character, designed by special effects guru Jim Beinke. We explored the idea of launching a viral marketing campaign for the film and with that came the mini-series. If you watch the Smiling Man on its own, it may not make sense during some moments since the goal of the viral marketing campaign was for the ‘participant’ to unlock videos as you attempted to crack codes and riddles on a viral website we had created to promote the film.

 

 

In your own personal opinion, what do you believe it is that makes the horror genre special? What sets it apart from other genres you have worked in?

I’ve always loved feeling the adrenaline rush that I get from watching a horror film. Frankly, it makes me feel alive. Not falling asleep because I watched Paranormal Activity? Or Insidious? Well, that’s part of it too. I love that feeling, and I hate it too. In some ways, the reason why I love the horror genre (particularly supernatural horror) is because demons, ghosts, spirits etc. No matter how scary they are, logically, if those entities exist, that must mean there is life after death. I personally find that comforting and reassuring.

What is your favorite scary movie?

I’d have to list two: Evil Dead II, and The Shining.

Do you have any plans for this coming Halloween? And fun traditions that you try to stick to every year?

I do. I’ll be releasing a VR Horror Series which I wrote, directed and produced called Scary Nights. Think Tales Form The Crypt meets Creepshow in VR with an all new iconic character who greets and leaves you at the top and tail end of each episode. If you like witches, scarecrows, clowns, etc… and if you’re a Goosebumps fan, then you will want to check it out.

As for Halloween traditions, I throw an intimate horror film viewing every year with close friends, for which I pick 4 horror films. We start with an old classic (generally Nosferatu or The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari), then move closer towards more recent horror films. Everyone cooks horror themed meals (hand meatloaf, eye popping soup, puking guac pumpkin).

What does the future hold for you? Anything you would like to plug to our readers? 

I’ve made the switch into full time producing nearly two years ago. I’ve started my own production company, CineWorld Pictures, and focus primarily on producing dramas. Surely can sound disappointing to some horror fans, but I haven’t forgotten about the horror genre. Maybe I’ll return to it when I find a horror script that I fall in love with.

As for plugging projects…though I would love to share, I unfortunately cannot at the moment. But I am working on some very exciting dramas with some extremely talented people that I cannot wait to share with the world.

What was the last thing that scared the hell out of you?

A supernatural nightmare I had last night.. Something about a possessed veiled old lady inside an old Victorian style mansion. Most definitely too scary to share. Proves however that the world of horror cinema quietly whispers for me to come back to it at night. And one day I shall, and I’ll make sure it’s a very good one, not found-footage, and more sophisticated than the ones I’ve done so far. Something more to the likes of The Shining or The Exorcist.

What was the last thing that made you smile?

My Border Collie sitting by my side as I’ve been writing my answers to this interview.

Eduardo Sanchez [Interview]

 

 

Welcome to Day 10 of Trainwreck’d Society’s Annual Month of Horror Showcase! We have a fully loaded month of all things horror for you fine folks! October is our favorite month for this very reason, and we are so excited to share 31 full days of film showcases and interviews with some of the finest folks from the world of horror, just as we have been doing for the last 6 years. What started as a simple 5 day showcase, has now blossomed into a full blown month long event. You’re going to love this! Enjoy!

 

Hello Folks! Today marks an incredible feet for us here at Trainwreck’d Society. Not only do we have an incredible guest to share with you all today….he’s actually our 500TH GUEST! I am so excited that the showing of our 500th guest happens to land during or covenanted Month of Horror showcase, and that it is the incredible filmmaker Eduardo Sanchez! Sanchez is one of the most inspirational figures in independent cinema, alongside his working partner Daniel Myrick, who we were fortunate to have on the side a few years ago. Together they created the now 20 year old film that shocked the world known as The Blair Witch Project. The shock to know that this film is now 20 years old has still not subsided. I truly feels like just a few weeks ago, and the internet was new, and we were all convinced that we were seeing something real and terrifying. But, we will get into more about this next week where we talk a bit more about a very special 20th Anniversary screening that will be happening in Brooklyn, New York with one of the film’s stars, Michael C. Williams, and the legend himself Eduardo Sanchez. Details are below. I implore everyone in the NYC area to get yourself down to King’s for this truly special event.

I truly cannot think of a better person to be appointed as being our 500th guest here today rather than Eduardo. He is a pioneer in the world of independent cinema, and as a long-time independent publication like ours, we respect the architects. And his brilliance definitely expands beyond creating the most successful indie film of all time. He has been consistently putting out incredible horror, thriller, and beyond, projects for the last 20 years in both the world of film and television. From shows like Queen of the South and From Dusk Till Dawn: The Series, to films like Altered and Lovely Molly, Sanchez has an awe-inspiring career, and we so so excited to have him with us today!

So Folks, as we’ve said 499 times before, please enjoy some wonderful words from our 500th Guest here at Trainwreck’d Society, the legendary Eduardo Sanchez!

 

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What inspired you to get into the world of entertainment? Was it an early aspiration you can always remember having since your youth, or did you just find yourself in this world one day?

I’ve always felt like I wanted to make films and entertain, but growing up in a suburb of DC, I didn’t know anyone in the entertainment industry, let alone someone that made films. So I just kept it as an interest until High School where I took a TV production class and was hooked from day one. I realized I could actually make a living in this field, something that until then had just been a dream.

What was your first paid gig in the world of entertainment? And were there any kind of lessons learned from this project that still affect your work today?

I was a PA for a local production company. It was pretty fun and exciting but also a lot of hard work. Just learned how tough it was on a set – long hours and such – but also learned about working as part of a team, skills that I still use to this day.

20 years ago, yourself and our old friend Daniel Myrick, brought one of the most exciting and original stories to life with the insanely successful film The Blair Witch Project. Looking back two decades later, and the inspiration that the film became, what would you say is Blair Witch’s contribution to the world of horror?

I think the biggest contribution to the genre was the inspiration that a tiny film could still make a big impact on the cinematic world. We came out of nowhere with a pretty unique idea and somehow we made it onto theater screens around the world. It showed people that a small, cool idea still has value in the film business if you played your cards right and had some serious luck on your side.

How do you want the film to be remembered in say another 20 years from now?

As a testament to the power of independent film. Like I said above, that a spark can come from anyone and anywhere.

In the world of television, you worked on a few episodes of one of our favorite recent series, in which we have spoken with quite a few people who have worked on, entitled From Dusk Till Dawn: The Series. What drew you to this series?

Robert Rodriguez offered me a job. How could I turn it down?

And how was your time working on it?

It was nerve-wracking at first. This was the first episode of television I ever directed and somehow I ended up with the third episode of the first season. I was the first director to take over the show (Robert did the first two episodes) and I was doing scenes directly taken from the film. It was hard-core but I planned accordingly and the cast and crew were very welcoming and once I got into the groove, I was fine.

But it was pretty trippy to be directing scenes directly lifted from the film. It’s such an iconic movie so it was definitely tricky trying to bring my vision to it but not betraying what had come before.

Was there anything that set itself apart from the several other shows you have worked on?

It was a tough show. Lots of acton, stunts, make-up and practical effects in every episode, so we had to move quickly. But it was a blast and the people that worked on it were wonderful. Such a great education for me as an upstart TV director.

 

 

In your own personal opinion, what do you believe it is that makes the horror genre special?

Horror films are the perfect form of escapism. People love to be scared – but they also want to be safe. With horror, you can go on this wild ride where all kinds of horrible shit is happening to people on screen and you can share in their plight but then it ends and the lights come on and you can go on with your normal, relatively safe life. It’s great fun if you’re into that kind of stuff.

What sets it apart from other genres you have worked in?

It’s a great genre to work in because there are so many sub-genres within it that allow you to spread your wings creatively as a filmmaker. You can go from monster movies to straight dramas to action and comedy – you can do almost anything as long as it falls in some way under that horror umbrella.

What is your favorite scary movie?

The Exorcist is the scariest movie for me in terms of basic fear. But I have many favorites in the genre: Jaws, The Amityville Horror, The Shining, The Changeling, Evil Dead 2 just to name a few.

Do you have any plans for this coming Halloween?

We are pitching a tv show with Sam Raimi right before Halloween that I’m pretty excited about. Going to be cool pitching with him in the room…

Any fun traditions that you try to stick to every year?

Unfortunately, I’ve been working out of town for the last 2-3 Halloweens so I’ve missed all the fun. But this year I’m home so hopefully we can go all out at the house. I don’t do that much but I do set up a smoke machine and some props from some of my films and then blast scary music over some speakers. It freaks the little kids out a bit but that’s kind of what it’s all about, isn’t it?

 

 

What does the future hold for you? Anything you would like to plug to our readers? 

Doing some Blair Witch 20th anniversary screenings in October which will keep me busy. Also, my partner Gregg Hale and I are working on some TV show ideas that we’re pitching soon and I’m directing a new show for FOX called NeXt that I’m pretty excited about. Loved the pilot and the concept of the show and we’re shooting in Chicago, which is a first for me, so really looking forward to it.

Then in January I go to Vancouver to direct my fifth and final episode of Supernatural, which is going to be really special since it’s the last season of the long-running show. Lots of people to say goodbye to after that one is done…

What was the last thing that scared the hell out of you?

Besides my credit card bill, nothing that I’d want to share right now.

What was the last thing that made you smile?

Galaxy’s Edge at Disney World. It was even more magical than I expected it to be!

 

Hannah Emily Anderson [Interview]

Welcome to Day 9 of Trainwreck’d Society’s Annual Month of Horror Showcase! We have a fully loaded month of all things horror for you fine folks! October is our favorite month for this very reason, and we are so excited to share 31 full days of film showcases and interviews with some of the finest folks from the world of horror, just as we have been doing for the last 6 years. What started as a simple 5 day showcase, has now blossomed into a full blown month long event. You’re going to love this! Enjoy!

If you all can think about to close to 3 years ago, during a previous rendition of our Month of Horror, we may have gotten a slight tease about a “new” addition to the saw franchise that was “coming soon”, from one of the film’s screenwriters, Pete Goldfinger. Well, much has happened since then. Jigsaw hit theaters almost a year later, and out of it we learned about the brilliance of one of the film’s stars, of which we are so excited to have with us here today! It’s Hannah Emily Anderson, Everyone! Hannah is an absolute star, especially in the world of horror having not only amazingly entered the Saw franchise, she can also be seen on the first season of the television adaptation of The Purge, in which is she is also so brilliant in. She is an absolute gem of a human being and has even managed to work in the world of comic book movies that are all the rage right now, appearing as Elaine Grey in this year’s hit film Dark Phoenix.

Yes, Hannah is all over the place and doing incredible work and we are so excited to see what the future has in store for this incredible actress. So Folks, please enjoy some wonderful words from the absolutely brilliant Hannah Emily Anderson!

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What inspired you to get into the world of entertainment and filmmaking? Was it an early aspiration you can always remember having since your youth, or did you just find yourself in this world one day? 

I grew up wanting to be a surgeon, which makes sense, because I was just fascinated by the inner workings of people. I found myself ever curious, wondering why people were the way they were, where did they come from, what drove them, what made them different. 

My parents also fostered a love of the Arts in me. We went to the Ballet, the Symphony, and the Theatre. I remember seeing my first real play when I was 12 and it absolutely thrilled me.
I did also love to perform but didn’t think I was good enough to do it for a living, or that an acting career was even possible. I was in college for Creative Communications (PR, Advertising, Journalism, Broadcast) when I got an opportunity to be a stand-in for actress Clemence Poesy. I was so close to the action, watching great actors like Forest Whitaker work their magic. I loved it so much that I quit college and moved to Toronto to audition for Theatre school. I got in. 

What was your first paid gig in the world of entertainment? And were there any kind of lessons learned from this project that still affect your work today? 

My first gig was a one line part on the show The L.A. Complex. I had NO idea what I was doing. All I had to do was step onto my mark, say my line, then step off, but I was terrified I’d forget what to say and fuck it all up. I got through the day by watching the other actors and basically copying everything they did. They seemed comfortable, at ease, speaking in their natural voices, but they also made mistakes. That job taught me how to push through my nerves, that I’ll never really feel like I know what i’m doing, that it’s okay to make mistakes, and that being able to stay relaxed on set is key. 

In your own personal opinion, what do you believe it is that makes the horror genre special? What sets it apart from other genres you have worked in? 

The horror genre makes it safe to explore any topic freely, especially if it’s political (I stole that from a conversation I had with Jigsaw writer Josh Stolberg, but it’s true!) The Purge series, for example? Race, politics, status, the faults of America in general…it challenges you, it makes you question what you believe. Horror is also a full body experience. Whether I’m watching it or acting in it, It gets my blood pumping and my imagination working in a way that no other genre 

does. It tends to be more physically demanding. Acting like you’re terrified out of your mind is one of the hardest things to do. And how do I learn to do that? By watching horror movies and literally being terrified out of my mind. 

In 2017 you appeared in the latest addition of the Saw franchise, co-written by our dear friend and past guest Pete Goldfinger, entitled Jigsaw. I am curious to know what drew you this project? Were you previously a fan of the franchise? And how was your experience working in the world of Jigsaw? 

Saw is such an iconic franchise. I watched Saw 1 and 2 when they first came out and couldn’t believe how twisted and gory they were. When I actually got the part (off a last minute tape) and I had the chance to be part of this franchise, I just couldn’t say no to that! To go from watching this iconic villain when I was in high school, to suddenly sitting next to him in the makeup trailer?? I was pinching myself.

 

Photo by Brooke Palmerÿ

I had SO much fun on set. I enjoyed playing that cat and mouse game with the audience. Am I the killer? Am I not? And being in a separate story line from the victims, I got off pretty easy. The other actors were always covered in blood and screaming. I escaped all of that. Plus, Matt Passmore-who plays Logan, is such a goof. We’d be singing, dancing, and joking around, right up until “Action!” 

The following year you appeared front and center in the wonderful television addition to one of my personal favorite modern horror/thriller franchises, with The Purge. So what drew you to the beautiful bit of madness that is this franchise? 

This was the opposite experience in that I knew nothing about The Purge going in. I’d never heard of or seen the films. (I know, crazy). Reading the script sent shivers up my spine and I didn’t understand what The Purge was until the end of the pilot, so the concept was a surprise. I thought it was brilliant. 

I was attracted to this character trying to do good and desperately hold onto her own morals on a night of pure evil; driven by a pure intention to help others, but then being forced into making life or death decisions. Jenna is also privileged, and most people in privilege don’t have to think about what they’d be willing to sacrifice to protect the ones they love, to protect themselves. The show is constant high stakes and a lot of action. Pretty much an actor’s dream. But man, was it ever a marathon. 

What is your favorite scary movie? 

Ooooo tough one. It’s a toss up between The Shining and The Babadook, two of the only films I’ve never been able to properly finish out of pure terror. 

Do you have any plans for this coming Halloween? And fun traditions that you try to stick to every year? 

I plan on trying, once again, to convince my partner to dress up and coordinate costumes. Good luck to me.

My family and I used to turn off all the lights and pretend we weren’t home (my parents’ idea) so we could watch a spooky movie in the basement in peace. I will not be continuing that tradition. I’ll be eating boatloads of chocolate and hopefully handing out what’s left to the kids. 

What does the future hold for you? Anything you would like to plug to our readers? 

I’m trying to get through Toronto’s top 100 restaurants, so I have a lot of eating to do. I’d also love to do more travelling.

Work wise, a really cool horror/thriller film I’m in called The Ballad of Audrey Earnshaw will be coming out sometime in the next little while. I’m also writing a comedy web series with my writing buddy and actress Elyse Levesque (her latest film: Ready or Not), that we hope to make in the not too distant future. 

What was the last thing that scared the hell out of you? 

I had a terrible nightmare I was being attacked by a strange man. I tried to scream and nothing came out. I woke up shouting and sweating, in a total panic. I thought I was going to have a heart attack! 

What was the last thing that made you smile? 

A baby boy smiled and waved to my partner and I as we walked by. It was so genuine, innocent, and sweet. 

Stuart Flack [Interview]

 

Welcome to Day 8 of Trainwreck’d Society’s Annual Month of Horror Showcase! We have a fully loaded month of all things horror for you fine folks! October is our favorite month for this very reason, and we are so excited to share 31 full days of film showcases and interviews with some of the finest folks from the world of horror, just as we have been doing for the last 6 years. What started as a simple 5 day showcase, has now blossomed into a full blown month long event. You’re going to love this! Enjoy!

 

If you can remember as far back as to last week, you will remember we were gushing over a certain film that is hand’s down one of the best of the year during our interview with the film’s director. That film is Room For Rent. And we still love it, like a lot. So much so, we are extremely excited to have the man who penned this truly fascinating story. It’s Stuart Flack, Everyone! He is an absolute genius of a wordsmith and we are so excited that he was able to share a few words with us here today during our most celebrated time for the world of horror. To have both the director and the writer of our favorite horror film of 2019 show up in this very special month is a true god damned delight, and a real honor.

So Folks, please enjoy some wonderful words from the brilliant writer himself, the great Stuart Flack!

 

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What inspired you to get into the world of writing? Was it an early aspiration you can always remember having since your youth, or did you just find yourself in this world one day?

Some of my earliest memories involve books and writing. I was always that kid who was either reading stories or writing them. When I was about five, I ‘borrowed’ my mother’s diary and started filling in imaginary entries. It was the kind of shakily-written, simplistic stuff you’d expect of a kid that age, but looking back it was definitely a sign of what was to come.

What was your first paid gig in the world of writing? And were there any kind of lessons learned from this project that still affect your work today? 

My first paid gig was writing for the glamorous world of… shipping insurance. That gig quickly snowballed into a lot more copywriting for well-known brands. There were many times I resented having to write that stuff rather than all the stories in my head, but advertising is actually great training for a writer: you quickly learn that the business of writing involves collaboration and compromise, and that deadlines matter.

You penned the script to the recently released and absolutely brilliant film Room For Rent, one of my favorite films of the year. It is a very unique and fun mystery/thriller of a film that had me scared for damn sure. With that in mind, I am curious to know what inspired you to tell this tale? Where did the inspiration come from tell the tale?

I wrote the script years ago, in a cold and draughty old house in Shanghai. I was having some relationship issues at the time, so I found myself toying with the idea of a character who has regrets: that life and love hadn’t worked out the way she wanted, and that those regrets were beginning to poison her entire character. It was important to me that she also be an unreliable narrator, so that we’re never quite sure whether we should sympathize or run.

 

 

And as I know that things can change from pen to screen, I am curious to know what your thoughts are on the film that is now out in the world?

The original script was set in a run-down English seaside town in mid-winter, so it was fascinating to see how the director, Tommy Stovall, translated it to Arizona in mid-summer. It was a good reminder that the story’s themes are universal: loneliness, longing and revenge work in any setting. Lin Shaye did a great job of making the role her own. In addition to being the queen of horror, she has truly brilliant comedic timing, which added another dimension to the character. I think that’s what makes filmmaking so special: it’s a highly collaborative process, with everyone bringing something important to the table.

What is your favorite scary movie?

The first scary movie I ever saw from start to finish was Jaws, and it will always have a special place in my heart. I was really young at the time—probably way too young to be watching people get ripped apart by a psycho shark—and it scared the hell out of me. Even now, I think of that movie every time I go swimming in the sea.

Do you have any plans for this coming Halloween? And fun traditions that you try to stick to every year?

There are so many cool things to do at Halloween, but my ultimate definition of horror is to be queuing for hours in super-crowded places. If friends are having a party, I enjoy rising to the challenge of finding a good costume. Otherwise, I prefer to keep the evening low-key. 

What does the future hold for you?

My agent in LA is currently shopping a new script. It’s a psychological thriller that’s been getting strong coverage, so I’m hopeful it can find a good home. In the meantime, of course, there are more scripts to write. I’m also a published novelist under a different name, all of which keeps me pretty busy.

What was the last thing that scared the hell out of you?

I was recently hiking near the largest glacier in France. It was jaw-dropping—and I do mean that literally—to see how much the glacier has retreated in just the last twenty or thirty years. It’s like we’re living in the first act of a monumental horror movie, but most people still seem to be in denial that we’re alone in the woods surrounded by climate-change zombies. It’s becoming more and more obvious that the second act is going to be a total bloodbath. 

What was the last thing that made you smile?

I really appreciate a dark sense of humor. I had the chance to see Bianca del Rio on tour this summer. Most of her jokes were deeply inappropriate. Weeks later, they’re still making me laugh.

 

 

 

Jackson Davis [Interview]

 

Welcome to Day 7 of Trainwreck’d Society’s Annual Month of Horror Showcase! We have a fully loaded month of all things horror for you fine folks! October is our favorite month for this very reason, and we are so excited to share 31 full days of film showcases and interviews with some of the finest folks from the world of horror, just as we have been doing for the last 6 years. What started as a simple 5 day showcase, has now blossomed into a full blown month long event. You’re going to love this! Enjoy!

 

Welcome to Week 2, Folks! And we are kicking the week off on a high note with some words from an absolutely brilliant actor. It’s Jackson Davis, Everyone! For regular readers around here, you will recognize Jackson as the man who brilliantly starred in one of our favorite films of 2018 known as The Basement. Jackson have over a dozen wonderful performances in just one film. I was truly fascinated in watching him move in and out of different characters throughout the film, and I remain so today! I had been wanting to talk to Mr. Davis about his work on this gem of a film for quite some time, and I am very excited that we were able to include him in our biggest celebration of the world of horror. To say he is a perfect fit would be an understatement to say the least.

So Folks, please enjoy some wonderful words from the brilliant Jackson Davis!

 

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What inspired you to get into the world of entertainment? Was it an early aspiration you can always remember having since your youth, or did you just find yourself in this world one day?

Growing up I always wanted to be a standup comedian. Or on SNL. That was the dream. But, life happens and I just ended up being an actor 🙂 Growing up I didn’t really think about acting or dream about it.  I just wanted to make people laugh and be on stage.

What was your first paid gig in the world of entertainment? And were there any kind of lessons learned from this project that still affect your work today?

My first job was a pilot called wrigleyville. It was a great project and I was just so excited to be there.  It shot in Chicago and All the actors lived together in this apartment building.  I am sure I learned a lot but what exactly I couldn’t tell you. It was 14 years ago. But I know that every time I work on something I learn something.

Your performance in 2018’s The Basement was absolutely wonderful, the stuff that genius is made of, I seriously believe. Your role seemed like it would be a lot of work to pull off. So, I am curious to know what it was like to take on multiple insane roles in one film?

Well first thank you so much for that. You’re too kind 🙂 I’ll take it though haha.

This was unlike any other job i’d done before. There was a few challenges. The first and most obvious was there is a lot of dialog. We were lucky that I had a month or two to prep before shooting which doesn’t ever happen. Usually it’s, ya know, we start next week. So I had time to learn the lines.

The second challenge was figuring out all these different characters. And how to make each one of them different from one another. With the characters that I felt were nurturing I tried to give them a feminine touch. The more violent characters had a lot more testosterone. I wanted them to be big and broad. We are gonna be in that basement for a long time with just the two of us so we felt it was okay making them bigger.

We also had a few rehearsals before so I got a chance to show the directors what I was thinking and vice versa. We shot basically one character a day. So there wasn’t a lot of time on the day. They had to be ready to go.

 

 

In your own personal opinion, what do you believe it is that makes the horror genre special? What sets it apart from other genres you have worked in?

I think what makes it special is the fans of horror. I don’t think there are any other genres quite like it. They enjoy it to the max. They Will find it wherever it is. And they let each film be what it is.

What is your favorite scary movie?

In truth I didn’t grow up with horror films. I wasn’t aloud to watch them. I think my parents knew I couldn’t handle it, haha. I once as a kid saw a scene from some piranha horror film from the 80’s and I wouldn’t go in pools for months. I honestly still think about it when i’m swimming laps at the gym sometimes.

Editor’s Note: the film reference is most likely Joe Dante’s “Piranha”, and yes is a completely rational fear. Also our dear friend Pete Goldfinger is one of the geniuses behind “Piranha 3D” & “Piranha 3DD”. Also terrifying! Okay, back to the show!

 

Do you have any plans for this coming Halloween? And fun traditions that you try to stick to every year?

No each year is different and it’s always very last minute. A few Halloweens ago I was at a party and Mike Tyson was there!! Everyone saw him but somehow I never did. Maybe it was just someone dressed up like him. I like to think that cuz I was so bummed I didn’t see him.

What was the last thing that scared the hell out of you?

The serious answer is I see things on the news every day that scare the hell out me. But the more fun answer is, I like to hide and scare my friends so in revenge one of my friends just did it to me. I was walking out of my house and he jumped out from behind a car. It was at night and I knew he was there, but still it got me.

What was the last thing that made you smile?

Right after the dude scared me. I laughed. You got to respect a good scare.

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday Bloody Sunday Matinee: MOMO: The Missouri Monster [Film]

 

Welcome to Day 6 of Trainwreck’d Society’s Annual Month of Horror Showcase! We have a fully loaded month of all things horror for you fine folks! October is our favorite month for this very reason, and we are so excited to share 31 full days of film showcases and interviews with some of the finest folks from the world of horror, just as we have been doing for the last 6 years. What started as a simple 5 day showcase, has now blossomed into a full blown month long event. You’re going to love this! Enjoy!

 

Synopsis:

“The year was 1972 and the place was a tiny, quaint, riverfront town called Louisiana, Missouri. On a warm summer evening, two local kids saw a creature in their own backyard holding a dead dog. Before you could say the word “Bigfoot”, local media and police officials had pounced on the story. Overnight Louisiana became “monster central” with creature seekers and monster hunters combing the woods to look for “the thing” that the newspapers had dubbed “MOMO”. One particular family was at the center of this whirlwind of activity and as the Missouri Monster sightings began to increase, so did the negative impact on the Harrisons.

In 1975, a film crew set out to tell an over-the-top, filmic version of the MOMO sightings. Due to one reason or another, this should-have-been-cult-classic was never released. Until now.” – Justin Cook PR
******

 

Sometimes it’s not all about getting the living hell scared out of yourself when enjoying quality horror cinema. Sometimes, it can actually be pretty funny. Some of the best works of horror combine a comedic element to counteract with gruesome material to create an overall entertaining experience. And that is exactly what you will get with the rockumentary/narrative bigfoot related film you should all definitely see in the form of MOMO: The Missouri Monster. It’s just so damn much fun. The combination of grind house-esque b movie narrative scenes with the documentary aspect creates and overall incredible cinematic experience that you truly do not want to miss!

 

MOMO: The Missouri Monster is available now on DVD and wherever you watch your movies.

 

Splatterday Special: American Killing [Film]

 

Welcome to Day 5 of Trainwreck’d Society’s Annual Month of Horror Showcase! We have a fully loaded month of all things horror for you fine folks! October is our favorite month for this very reason, and we are so excited to share 31 full days of film showcases and interviews with some of the finest folks from the world of horror, just as we have been doing for the last 6 years. What started as a simple 5 day showcase, has now blossomed into a full blown month long event. You’re going to love this! Enjoy!

 

Synopsis:

“Jeb’s cartoon is on the verge of cancellation, so the studio sends him and an eclectic team of writers to a secluded house in the mountains.   As Jeb’s controlling personality and obsessive work ethic starts to push the team apart, he goes even further by planting spy cameras in places shared and private, obsessed on what everone is doing.  Jeb is soon fired by the studio but he continues to spy in sercret from his home leading him further down the road to madness. In his most desperate hour, Jeb seals his fate as a viscous madman by returning to the house and murdering his writers one-by-one, on camera. Past emotions and tensions flare, and while nothing goes as Jeb planned, the unforeseen twists, turns, and revelations make his snuff film a violent spectacle sure to go down in infamy.” – October Coast PR

 

******

Oh boy, strap in Folks! If you are a fan of watching a seemingly innocent protagonist slip away into insanity, I simply cannot recommend American Killing enough. It is an absolute delight with a tension build up that is truly gripping and is sure to scare all the hell right out of you. Trevor Peterson gives the performance of his career as Jeb, a man who will seemingly do absolutely anything to be approved as a real artist. Jeb’s obsessions and malicious intentions kick into gear very early in the film, and it culminates in a truly breathtaking fashion. As the body count begins to go up, so does the excitement!

 

 

American Killing is what I believe to be a perfect induction for the films we will be showcasing this month during our Month of Horror. The film relies quite heavily on the clever and clearly well written story line from writer and co-director Matthew D. Ward. While the stylization of the film is very well done, it all boils done to a brilliant story to be told with all the suspense you can attempt to digest. And as we always say, good writing has to be back up with great performances. The combination of the two can not be overstated enough. And, as you could probably guess because we are even talking about it at all, American Killing has some absolutely wonderful performances. Persia White and Caitlyn Gerard breath life into their eccentric characters. And the appearance of Demetri Goritsas was a real treat (side note: Demetri happened to appear in “Nosedive”, my single favorite episode of Black Mirror). Everyone gave it their all in the making of this film, and the evidence of such is in the beautiful final product that his this class A horror film.

 

American Killing is available now on DVD and VOD wherever you get your films.