Camille Winbush [Interview]


Today’s interview subject is a wonderful person who I feel as though I have literally watched grow up and become the amazing performer that is making incredible moves in the world of film and television today. It’s Camille Winbush! She appeared in Jim Jarmusch’s absolutely incredible cult classic film Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai before she was even aged into double digits. She showed a flair for the world of acting, and has only gone on to prove herself to be one of the finest actresses of our time.

Seriously folks, from watching her battle it out on screen with the legendary Bernie Mac for 5 seasons on one of the greatest television sitcoms of all time known as The Bernie Mac Show, to her success on The Secret Life of the American Teenager, right on up to the film Bachelor Lions that was released this year, Camille has proven herself to be an unstoppable force who can not be stopped. We have some wonderful words from her below, most notably that she has come to the realization that creating her own content is absolutely crucial, and that is the path she is on now. I cannot tell you how amazing this sounds to me! I am so excited to see what the future holds for Winbush, although obvious further success is almost guaranteed with her level of talent.

So Folks, please enjoy some wonderful words from the immensely talented individual that is Camille Winbush!

You have been acting for practically your entire life! When did you personally decide that the world of acting was one that you want to make a living in?

I started acting when I was two years old. At that time I had no idea what acting was! It was just something I grew up doing. Honestly, I don’t think I really appreciated or understood the magnitude of the business until I was about nineteen or so. 

What was your very first gig you can remember getting? How old were you, and do you remember anything from that experience that you still incorporate into your work as well?

The first job that I can remember doing was a show called Viper, which was about a talking smart car. I believe I was around four at the time. There was a big fight scene in which the guy who played my dad got punched in the face and I started crying because I thought he was really hurt. The director loved my reaction and thought I was the best little actress he’d ever seen. And then my mom had to explain to me it was all pretend. I learned that real tears help book jobs and to this day I can make myself cry in less than five minutes. 

You role as Pearline in the cult classic Jim Jarmusch film Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai was just downright delightful! Has there ever been talk about doing a Pearline-centric sequel given that she read the Hagakure? If it were to happen, what direction would you want to take her in as an adult?

Let me start by saying that Forrest Whitaker and Isaac de Bankolé were such cool guys to work with. They both had a calming presence on set. Jim Jarmusch was also great, and a real character in his own right. There has been fan talk about RZA producing a sequel with Pearline as the lead, but I don’t know that it will ever happen. If it did, I’d love to see her take on some of the same characteristics as Ghost Dog and become a bad ass neighborhood underground superhero of sorts. 

You spent some of your formative years brilliantly portraying Nessa on The Bernie Mac Show, which is one of the greatest of all time, in my opinion. We’ve spoken with a few other folks who have spent a lot of years inside a world with a TV family, and I am always curious to know how closely it really felt like a family? Did you have a sense of closeness with your on screen family members?

The Bernie Mac Show definitely left a lasting positive impact on my life. I spent five years with that cast and crew, and essentially we were together on set more than we were at home. We were blessed enough to actually like each other so we did become a real family. So much so that every Friday night after wrap we would all get together for what we called “the bump and grind” which was the whole cast and crew partying together doing karaoke, eating, and dancing. We pretty much had a family reunion every weekend. I like to think everyone on that set had a part in shaping me to be the actor and woman I am now. 

If you were handed the opportunity to portray any inspirational figure in American history, who would it be?

I would love to play a young Maya Angelou or Nina Simone. I feel like there is so much depth to them and their stories need to be told the right way. (No shade) So to be able to play either of them would be a welcome challenge and an honor. 

We always like to ask this question to our statue award friends: Where do you physically keep your well deserved NAACP Image Awards? And does their physical location hold any sort of significance to you?

My NAACP Image awards, along with every award I’ve ever gotten in life ranging from gymnastics to young entrepreneur, is kept at my parents house. Not saying that I don’t appreciate them, but I’ve never been the type to dwell on physical memories of achievement. So I don’t need to see them everyday as a reminder of what I’ve accomplished. I think my parents have earned the right to show them off. Without them I wouldn’t have any of them anyway!

 


What does the future hold for you? Anything you would like to plug to our readers?

I recently came to the conclusion that I am meant to be self sufficient and can no longer work for other people. With that being said, my future will revolve around projects that I create. With everything from owning a small business, to producing my own shows and movies. I also filmed a project earlier this year called FraXtur with a great team of people so hopefully that will be out soon. And follow me on social media because you know, 2018. Instagram & Twitter- @camilleSwinbush 

What was the last thing that made you smile?

The last thing that made me smile was my five year old cousin asking for an Eskimo kiss. Which she calls “Nose”. 

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About rontrembathiii
write. write. write.

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